Posted in Travel, places to visit, mini-adventures, Walks

Waterfalls in Teesdale

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Last year Simon and I enjoyed a visit to the historic market town of Richmond, Yorkshire. One of our adventures can be seen here: Muker and the highest pub in Britain (528m/1732ft)

We liked Richmond so much that this year we decided to spend Simon’s birthday weekend in the same town again. We had booked our b&b a month earlier; the weather was the last thing on our minds. But one month on and the UK had already suffered from the tantrum of Storm Ciara – and now Storm Dennis was due on our Richmond weekend.

Hmmm. I wondered if we hadn’t already booked our accommodation, would we have called the weekend off?

The roads going to and back from Richmond were fine, but one could see many of the fields were flooded.

On the Sunday of our stay, we took a trip to see Low and High Force Waterfalls in Upper Teesdale, County Durham. They’re located within a National Nature Reserve.

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However, we had to take two detours as one road had a sign warning motorists to go no further because it was closed due to flooding.

And another road was open but a massive puddle flooded it. A large 4×4 could get through but a small Skoda?

Maybe not.

We didn’t take the risk anyway.

So instead of going through Barnard Castle (which is a small town with, you’ve guessed it, a castle), we went through the village of Middleton instead. On our way back we enjoyed a hot drink and warming tomato soup at a little cafe called Rumours.

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There is a car park where we nearly parked last year. On that occasion, we hoped to have a quick walk before heading on our way back to our respective homes. But there was a charge that had to be paid by a certain number of minutes – or else a lovely fine would come through the door.

And they had CCTV to check.

You also had to pay extra to actually see the falls.

So after a quick exit, hoping that we hadn’t been in the car park for more than 10 minutes, we had the luck of spotting a lay-by where cars could park for free and you could walk for free to see the falls.

That time we didn’t see High Force, but we still had a pleasant walk along the river, enjoying the calmer sight of Low Force.

One year later, we parked in the lay-by again. Evidence of Ciara and Dennis (the rain of which we endured the evening before) could be seen in the muddy paths. Thankfully I was wearing good walking boots!

We walked along a single-person bridge over the River Tees. A sign which is often ignored considering the numbers of people on it that afternoon. When I strolled across, three people were behind me!

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The first bridge was built in 1741 and, according to the sign at the site, ‘was the earliest known suspension bridge in Europe ‘. Tragically, three men fell in the river in 1802 after one of the chains snapped. One of the men died. The current bridge was built in 1830.

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Low Force was just as scenic as I remembered. It drops over the Whin Sill, a layer comprising a hard rock called dolerite. Locally, it’s known as whinstone.

As we followed the muddy path towards High Force, we admired artistic carvings along the walls.

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Juniper trees seemed bigger than I’d seen before – but unfortunately a sign declared that a disease was killing them in the area.

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There were boot wash facilities en route but whether walkers took this precaution is another matter.

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High Force is a dramatic scene. As I mentioned, we had just had two storms in a fortnight and bystanders could see the amazing effect of this on the waterfall. The power of the River Tees gushing down the 70ft cliff edge is highly impressive. With the heavy rainfall, it formed two falls but I have heard that, in exceptional conditions, the level of the river could even reach and flow down the middle section of rock.

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It looked rather intimidating too, but thankfully we were safe at our viewing point!

Despite appearances, High Force is not quite the highest waterfall in England, according to Wikipedia. It seems Cautley Spout in Cumbria is nearly 590ft (180m) high! But the Wikipedia entry also says High Force ‘does have the largest volume of water falling over an unbroken drop when in full spate’.

It’s an amazing sight to see.

Fact of the Day

The word ‘Force’ comes from ‘Foss’, an Old Norse word for waterfall. The word came with Viking settlers more than 1,000 years ago.

(Information from a sign at the High Force site).

 

Posted in Travel, places to visit, mini-adventures

A trip back in time – Beamish

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Beam me up Scotty – or should it be beam me back?

Fancy being beamed back in time? Well, Beamish is the way to go…

My mum and I went on a weekend trip to Durham and Beamish in March this year.

Technically I suppose Beamish is a museum, but it’s no old-fashioned establishment, with glass cases and labels, it is more like taking a trip back into time.

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When I was little, my favourite museum was Wigan Pier (the title may appear familiar because it is a title of a famous George Orwell book). Unfortunately it has since closed down, but back in the 1980s, and to my young eyes, it brought the past to life. It was both interactive and realistic and it felt like stepping back in time. The 1800s classroom with its realistic Victorian lesson was my favourite although I was a little intimidated by the strict teacher and the cane! (Don’t worry, it was never used!) 

Beamish is an open air museum, its title is The Living Museum of the North. Divided into four main sections on a 350-acre site, it’s possible to walk around the whole site or catch a free old-fashioned tram or bus. It is a circular site, well signposted and near impossible to get lost.

Our first visit was to the 1900s colliery, it’s amazing to think how mining and its subsequent landscape and culture was dominant in a lot of Britain not all that long ago. In fact, the site of Beamish was actually part of Durham’s coalfield.

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Mining provided jobs but it was also very dangerous and, according to my Beamish Guidebook, in 1913, a miner was killed or injured every five minutes on average. In that year, more than 1,000 miners died.

We didn’t go down the mahogany drift mine, which was open to visitors, but the site is an authentic view of what a colliery may have been like in those days, with its lamp cabin (and its collection of safety lamps), winding engine house, engine shed, waggons, railway and powder house.

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No spitting allowed in the lamp cabin!

Next to the colliery is the 1900s pit village, with its pit pony stables, chapel, silver band hall, fried fish shop, school and terraced houses.

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The 1940s Farm is near by, showing life in the North East during the Second World War – farms were important during that time as there were fears imported supplies could be cut off because of the war. So here we have the cottages, tractors and machines and animals. Of course, I loved to see the free range chickens wandering about!

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We realised that time was ticking on and there was still much to see. Luckily a tram was waiting at a tram stop, so on it we went, heading for the 1900s town which shows shops, businesses and houses of that era.

Stores include a drapery, grocery and co-op. The printer, stationery and newspaper branch office is also prominent on the main street, as is The Sun Inn.

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The town stables can be visited – horses were still the main form of transport in the early 1900s. Curiously, the Beamish Motor & Cycle Works is also in the 1900s town. This must have been an interesting time to live, with both horse and motor transport. Of course, later on, the car took over from the horse. My guide book says the motor ‘industry was still in its infancy, with little standardisation of car design, components and manufacture’. How different to today’s world where we take cars for granted.

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We had a very quick visit to the 1820s, with the late Georgian landscape reflecting the changing face of industrialisation. According to my trusty guidebook, in those days, fields were ploughed into ‘ridges and furrows, before mechanised farm machinery’, there would be traditional breeds of animal such as the Durham Shorthand cattle and the horse-powered whim gin was used to raise coal and men out of mines in the 1700s and early 1800s. Examples are seen at Beamish, as is an 1820s waggonway. Back in the day, it would have taken coal to the River Tyne or Wear.

A more creepy sight is the gibbet!

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Alas, we didn’t have time to visit 1820s Pockerley Old Hall or see much of Rowley Railway Station in the 1900s Town. And there was so much else to see in the 1900s town centre which we missed but I think that shows how Beamish is absolutely jam-packed with fascinating history. And they are also planning to reconstruct a 1950s town!

We spent four hours there, but eight hours could easily be spent.

Well, I guess we will just have to ask Beamish to ‘beam us back in time again’!