Posted in Environment, Environmental issues

Our World: A dangerous one for badgers

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I’ve never seen a live badger except in photos or television. Being shy, retiring and nocturnal animals, it’s unlikely I will ever just bump into one on the off-chance but I did see the curious sight of a badger sett. At least that is what it looked like.

Simon and I were out for a walk along a wooded path, in Lincolnshire, when we came across a mound of earth on a sloping bank. I was about to walk on, not thinking anything of it, but Simon wanted to investigate further. Behind the mound was a large hole, much bigger than a rabbit’s or even a fox’s.

We believe it was a badger’s sett.

I have heard that setts (badger homes) tend to have large spoil heaps outside, which this one did.

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Unfortunately the British Government appear to be on a mission to kill badgers because of tb fears for cattle. The fact there is a vaccine available for cows and a vaccine available for badgers appears to have been ignored. Tb may even be caused by cows moving around – maybe increased, temporary bio-security measures may be the answer?  

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I do have sympathy for farmers and cattle but I’m sure there must be a better way of combating this issue.

I feel it’s wrong, especially when there are other solutions, and how could it ever work? There will always be badgers, unless the plan is to decimate the entire population? (Surely that would be highly immoral!)

And what if there are other causes and all these badgers have been killed and still tb continues?

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Even worse is the issue of badger baiting. This is thankfully banned but unfortunately undesirables (I’m sorry but there is no other way of describing them) are still baiting the poor creatures with dogs.

Yes, unfortunately even in this ‘enlightened’ age, this happens.

This is barbaric and cruel, both to badgers and dogs.

Maybe one day, the world may be a kinder place for these creatures. I hope so.

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Facts of the Day

1. Badgers live in large family groups.

2. Setts are mostly in woodland, near to open areas and often on a slope.

3. Badgers are relatives of the weasel.

Author:

Interested in environmental issues, wildlife, spirituality, gardening, self-sufficiency and mini-adventures. There are two blogs, one is https://mysabbatical2014.wordpress.com/ and the other, more recent one, is - https://cosycottageandthequestforthegoodlife.wordpress.com/ ☺️

13 thoughts on “Our World: A dangerous one for badgers

  1. Every animal big and small plays a role to our world. In Calgary when I lived there they culled the ground squirrels because people complained of their landscaping being ruined. After the cull coyotes went after small dogs and children and they too were threatened. Thankfully the ground squirrels made up for it with a mass breeding and the coyotes had their food again. Interesting about the badgers, now I’m going to be compelled to google their role in the ecosystem. Good post!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you. Yes, I agree that when humans interfere with nature, the wider eco-system can also be affected adversely. Your comment about the ground squirrels is a good example. Too much ignorance and interference with nature unfortunately.

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  2. Well said, Clare. You echo my feelings entirely. The culling is madness, and it’s been proven to be ineffectual anyway. Vaccination is surely the way forward and it’s time humanity moved away from barbaric treatment of animals and realised they have as much right to be here as we do. This planet doesn’t exclusively belong to humans, however arrogant we appear to have become. Great post and pictures, and thanks for highlighting this important issue.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Alli, and thank you for reading. When there is an alternative to killing, and one that works, we really should be heading towards that. Hopefully one day the human species might be more enlightened.

      Liked by 1 person

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