Major Oak and the Legendary Sherwood Forest

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I may not have met Robin Hood but I did encounter another famous citizen of Nottinghamshire’s Sherwood Forest a few weeks ago – the Major Oak. This elderly and magnificent tree is at least 1,000 years old, has a 10m trunk and a canopy of 28m. It is so large, old and, unfortunately, vulnerable, that it has to be propped up and fenced in. But it is a truly grand sight indeed.

The Major Oak may be King of the Forest, but there are more than 1,000 ancient oaks in this woodland, making them ideal habitats for wildlife. To my eyes, they so looked like works of natural art!

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We saw many hollow oaks, the heartwood is decayed by fungi such as beefsteak fungus and chicken of the woods. These hollow oaks are excellent habitat for wildlife, including insects.

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To age a tree, one needs to count its annual rings. For the old trees of the forests, the Rspb, which manages the nature reserve in a partnership, looks at tree girth or diameter at breast height so the oaks don’t need to be felled. The above tree was over 100 years old, a mere youngster in these environs.

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As for Robin Hood, the most famous man of Nottinghamshire? It is believed he lived in around 1200 – at least, this is when the stories start – at a time when the forest covered 100,000 acres. He is seen as a heroic outlaw, avoiding the clutches of the Sheriff of Nottingham and robbing from the rich to give the poor. It is hard to tell whether he really existed, whether the character is based on a real man or if there is no basis in fact. Whatever the case, Sherwood Forest definitely exists, even if it feels as if it belongs in a beautiful legend. And the ‘Merry Men (and ladies) are its stunning oaks and accompanying wildlife.

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27 thoughts on “Major Oak and the Legendary Sherwood Forest

  1. Not far from me this place and I love it there.
    I walked around there quite a few times last year and year before.
    I hope to be there this year since new visitors centre opened up and RSPB now there.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What an absolutely fabulous post Clare – l love trees, they have a world of their own, l believe we should ‘slow look’ trees so we can read them and understand them. The oak above is majestic, the story it could tell .. truly excellent post with some stunning imagery – thank you for sharing it πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Hey Clare, l was there a few years ago, and saw some of the magnificence of treeart as l tend to call them, and yet l never saw this great oak.

        We have some truly beautifully ancient trees around the countryside here, sadly many of them are dead, but their shells left are just awesome.

        Liked by 1 person

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