Ladies who moult

IMG_20181116_084107

Poor Jemima! All summer she had the broody affliction which meant she didn’t want to leave her nest box in case her invisible (actually non-existent) eggs hatched. And when she finally snapped out of that, she started losing her feathers and became bedraggled and tatty looking. A poor specimen of her former, proud, snow-white plumage-covered glory.

IMG_20181116_084101

And then Florence started copying off her, losing her thick, soft plumage and becoming scrawny in appearance.

IMG_20181117_103957

(If you remember, Florence copied Jemima when she started brooding in the summer too. Is Jemima Florence’s role model?)

But panic not. It’s all part of the normal annual moulting process.

img_20181117_104538.jpg
Jemima looking scruffy while moulting

It’s in late summer/early autumn when birds begin to shed their feathers and grow new ones. Dottie went through her moult earlier this year, in September. Jemima and Florence are shedding their feathers in November. I don’t know when Mabel and Ava will go through the process for their first time.

For all hens, no eggs (or certainly very few) will be laid during this time – even from good layers such as hybrids.

IMG_20181117_103957

The advice for hen keepers is to make sure they have plenty of food as they will need good nutrition and protein to enable them to grow new feathers for the cold months ahead.

I pour a little apple cider vinegar into their water as a pick-me-up tonic as I saw it suggested in a book.

img_20181117_104359.jpg

Thankfully, nature has kindly given hens a helping hand during this process – the feathers are replaced slowly and this means chickens won’t lose too many feathers at once. A handy thing as it means they will still be able to fly out of danger (unless they’re a bantam, in which case it might be more a case of run out of danger!)

Facts of the Day

1. Young birds moult twice during their first six months of life.

2. A partial moult sometimes also occurs in the early part of the year, often just affecting the neck.

3. A young hen will take around 6 weeks to finish the process, it may be double that for older birds.

From Choosing & Raising Chickens, Jeremy Hobs on & Celia Lewis

 

Advertisements

15 thoughts on “Ladies who moult

    1. It would make sense for them to moult after winter and keep their feathers during the cold spell but if they lose their feathers earlier on in autumn, ideally they get their new feathers in time for winter. Unfortunately the timing seems to vary in which case they need extra straw to keep their balder patches warm!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s