Glasson Dock

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It’s hard to believe that today’s small, quiet and peaceful Glasson Dock was once the largest port in the North West of England (according to the Canal and River Trust website) and was used to import cotton, sugar, spices and slaves from the West Indies and Africa. It was opened in 1787 and is located at the head branch of the Lancaster Canal.

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I paid a visit with my parents recently. There is a large car park and, on the day, it was easy to find a space. It was a little confusing as the pay and display machine was blocked off and a notice said the car park would be run by a different operator. I assumed we didn’t have to pay. Oh well, if I was supposed to, I will soon find out I imagine!

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Unfortunately the pub we frequented last time was closed but there is another one five minutes away, across the swing bridge and past the Glasson Basin Lock on the West Quay. It is called The Dalton Arms, serving food and drinks. Sitting in a cosy corner, two of us had our tea while Guinness was the third refreshment chosen. The inn, like the port, also dates back to the 1700s.

Following refreshments, we embarked on a ramble along the canal, passing a few canal boats, two swans, several swallows flying overhead, a dog walker with two friendly cockapoodle canines and two middle-aged women clutching carrier bags, gathering blackberries. For jam or pies perhaps?

We also visited the Victorian Christ Church, built in 1840, which sits facing the canal.

Memorial plaques hanging on the walls give clues to its shipyard history. A customs house and shipyard were built in the village in 1834, focused more on repairing rather than building boats. In 1968, the shipyard was closed. The dry dock, which opened in 1841, was filled in 1969.

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The canal would have eventually taken us to the main branch of the Lancaster Canal where we could have headed to Preston or Lancaster.

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We didn’t go as far as that though, and after reaching a couple of bridges, we turned back, after a very pleasant and relaxing canal stroll.

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But the canal is only one picturesque part of Glasson Dock, the other side of the dock opens out to River Lune which, in the old days, would take ships out to sea. Not so much now.

Here, too, there are places to walk.

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The beauty of this hidden spot obviously makes it a welcome place for walkers and cyclists. The Bay Cycle Way, of which we saw signs, starts (or ends) at Glasson Dock and takes the cyclist on a 81-mile tour of Morecambe Bay up to the south coast of Cumbria. There is also the Lune Valley footpath, taking the walker up to Lancaster via splendid views across the estuary. One day I’ll do that. But today was just a very peaceful two or three-mile stroll in a beautiful yet uncrowded part of the world.

Glasson Dock – a haven of beauty and peace. Peace and beauty.

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5 thoughts on “Glasson Dock

    1. Thank you. I do love being around water environments, whether the coast or canals and Glasson Dock offers both of those. There are a lot of canal boats there, sometimes I think it would be lovely to live in one and go from place to place 🙂

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      1. I would like it there as well Clare. I like going to these big parks to the quiet and serene parts early in the morning when they are not crowded with other walkers, joggers and/or dog walkers. I like to just take in the peaceful and serene scene or enjoy nature.

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